Wu-Tang Clan | Slow Blues

Posted 2 weeks ago With 139 notes

“In our culture, we tend to move into cities that push nature away from us. In our mental environment, we do the same thing. Most people live within a very conventionalized set of notions that are deeply embedded in a larger set of notions. When we go to the physical edges, such as desert, jungle and remote and wild nature, and when we go to the mental edges with meditation, dreams and psychedelics, we discover an extremely rich flora and fauna in the imagination. This realm is ignored because of our tendency to see in words, to build in words, and to turn our backs on the raging ocean of phenomena that would otherwise overwhelm our metaphors.”

Terence McKenna, Chaos, Creativity and Cosmic Consciousness

Posted 2 weeks ago With 59 notes

Vincent  van Gogh - From ‘Almond Blossoms’ Series (1888-1890)

“Be clearly aware of the stars and infinity on high. Then life seems almost enchanted after all.”

Vincent van Gogh 

Posted 2 weeks ago With 1,256 notes

Fleetwood Mac | Dreams

Posted 3 weeks ago With 1,985 notes

reminder: get outdoors more often

“Amidst the worldly comings and goings, observe how endings become beginnings.”

Tao Te Ching 

Posted 1 month ago With 653 notes

“When you realize… that there’s nothing to realize—
That it’s all just here,
then what are you going to do?”

Alan Watts, The Trap of Seeking 

Posted 2 months ago With 4,400 notes


Galileo Galilei, Moon drawings, 1610. Siderius Nuncivs, Venice.

By Galileo’s time the Moon was believed to be perfectly smooth and incorruptible, like the Sun, based upon the teachings of Aristotle. In 1609 Galileo pointed his telescope to the Moon for the first time. He examined and drew the moon. The first description of Lunar craters were described in his book Sidereus Nuncius. Source

Galileo Galilei, Moon drawings, 1610. Siderius Nuncivs, Venice.

By Galileo’s time the Moon was believed to be perfectly smooth and incorruptible, like the Sun, based upon the teachings of Aristotle. In 1609 Galileo pointed his telescope to the Moon for the first time. He examined and drew the moon. The first description of Lunar craters were described in his book Sidereus Nuncius. Source